The following two video clips are used in conjuction with this lesson:

B1-C2.  Harrison, Mike.  Meet the super humans 

A transcript of the Channel 4 Paralympics meet the super humans video clip is provided and both the video clips are given in two different formats:

1. As a YouTube video clip. You will need an internet connection in your classroom to play it.  

2. As an mp4 file.  You can save this version to your own computer, which means you don’t need an internet connection in your classroom to play it. Right click on “Download Video in mp4 format” and select “Save link as” to save it to your computer.

 1.  Channel 4 Paralympics.  Meet the superhumans.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U08lAYIdZlE

 

Download Video in mp4 format HERE

 

 Transcript of the Channel 4 Paralympics meet the super humans video clip.

Watch the Meet the Superhumans trail  

Darkness frames a line of windows that look out at night towards the lights of a building. A single car drives away to the right, also reflected in an angled window on the left.  

Overhead lights flicker on revealing a still and empty swimming pool - the line of windows its glass wall on the far side. The swimming lanesrun from left to right with lights reflecting off the turquoise water. Forming a line down the centre are the starting blocks. The ceiling is constructed ofwhite beams and girders.  

Outside, and still at night, we move smoothly along the third lane of a running track, low to the ground and around the bend into the straight. On the left is the green grass of the athletics field, and on the right a fence and a grass bank.  

Next, and very briefly, looking down at the sharp bend of a cycle track in the velodrome with lines of different colours marked out on it. A bright white flares from the right and saturates the image.  

In a sports hall, a ground-level, close-up shot of a basketball with brown panels and a cream design running over it, rolling slowly to the right across the floor. Four or five large objects in the background aredark and blurred against the white court walls.  

Outside again, travelling beneath a white cloudy sky past a block of flats, with the Olympic stadium in the distance.  

Back at the pool, the silhouetted figure of a swimmer swinginga pair of goggles walks along a tiled passageway with lockers on the left handside and tall, floor-to-ceiling windows in the background.  

The wheelchair basketball team has gathered in a circle on court, each with their hand on either the shoulder or chair-wheel of the players beside them. Standing with them on the far side of the group, also with his arms round the players next to him, is a grey-haired, bearded man in a tracksuit, the coach Murray Treseder. The basketball board and hoop is up on the wall behind him.  

The sprinter Jonnie Peacock, slim with strawberry-blonde hair cut short at the back and sides, wavy and longer on top, is sitting in the weights room. He’s leaning forward, partially obscured, looking at the floor in front of him. Racks of large yellow weights are lined up on shelves behind him.  

The basketball team roll onto the polished court floor, the wheels of their chairs steeply angled outwards towards the bottom. The hall is grey and industrial-looking, as if still un-finished, with tarpaulins over the main lights hanging from the ceiling.  

The swimmer, Claire Cashmore, born without a left forearm, stands beneath a shower at the side of the pool with windows to one side and empty blue spectator seats behind her on the other.  

Outside, and viewed from an elevated distance, wheelchair racer Hannah Cockroft sprints around a bend on the racetrack, arms pumping as they turn the wheels.  

Still standing under the shower, Claire Cashmore opens her large blue eyes and looks directly at us as the water drops down around her in slow motion. Her wet, slicked back hair stops at the base of her neck, the red straps of her swimming costume bring colour to her pale skin. Behind her, a blurred view through the windows of the grey day outside.  

Under water another swimmer, Ellie Simmonds, wearing a blue swimming cap and dark goggles, blows out a stream of bubbles, kicking her legs behind her.  

A lone cyclist charges round the velodrome.  

Two basketball players reach up in unison for a high ball, arms outstretched, the force of their efforts lifting their chairs almost completely off the floor.  

Viewed from behind, a one legged swimmer stands by the side of the pool with a crutch wedged under her stump for balance, as she uses both hands to tuck her blonde hair into the base of her cap. The orange straps of her swimming costume criss-cross her muscular back.  

Wheelchair basketball player, Gaz Choudhry, leans forward to bounce the ball low on the floor in front of him - an intense, determined expression on his face.  

Two swimmers wearing black caps with their goggles up on their foreheads are led away from the pool. The first has his hand on the shoulder of a taller, sighted man in front of him who’s leading them. The second has his hand on the first one's shoulder. Spectators, contestants and officials crowd the background.  

Sitting at the tunnel entrance, waiting to go into an arena, an athlete wearing a blue GB T-shirt wiggles in her chair as she loosens up.  

Wearing a black swimsuit and cap, a swimmer standing at the edge of the pool spreads her arms back and out, then brings them back over her head as she warms up. The girl next to her, wearing the same, adjusts her cap in preparation. A grey-haired woman with an ear-piece sits behind them watching.  

Jonnie Peacock sits in profile on a wooden gym horse wearing grey jogging bottoms and a blue hoody, with his legs hanging down over the side - his right one replaced at the knee with a sickle-shaped running blade. On the white wall behind him is a poster of the human muscular system, two bodies side by side, front and back, the muscles a purplish red.  

A close-up of cyclist Jody Cundy in a dark top, wrap-around shades and a cycling helmet, moving in slow motion as he pedals.  

Footballers wearing black kits with red-topped socks, train on an artificial pitch, all wearing white blindfolds and dribbling balls across the goal mouth from left to right.  

A lone sprinter runs past in the fifth lane of a race track, filmed from the shoulders down with a running blade on his right leg below the knee.  

A wheelchair racer powers himself along in the rain and dark; a hole torn in the black clouds up ahead, letting in white sunlight.  

Two runners prepare to race, Jonnie on the right and a black man with two complete legs on the left.  

Ellie Simmonds stands poolside in a blue swimming cap, droplets of water on her skin, the blue spectator seats behind her empty.  

Officials in black and white tracksuits walk in a group, all carrying a runner’s starting block.  

A close up of wheelchair racer David Weir wearing a GB vest, with a tribal tattoo on his left shoulder.  

In the gym, Jonnie lifts a huge yellow weight above his head.  

Viewed from within the water, a swimmer dives off the side of a pool with a wall of windows behind her, and sets off.  

Suddenly we shift to a desert war zone and a soldier sitting in the back of a military vehicle as it moves along. Out of the window, three soldiers are walking behind it when a bomb explodes in the road, the blast knocking them to the ground.  

A video scan shows a baby moving in the womb. In hospital, as the heavily pregnant mother walks away with her hands clasped protectively over her bump, a doctor behind her says to a man, 'I know this is a shock.'  

On a busy motorway, a car on the other side of the road suddenly climbs up onto the crash barrier and flips over, skidding on its roof.  

A man with legs that end in bandaged stumps at the knees, does pull ups on some bars in a sports hall, the back of his grey top darkened with sweat.  

Outside, the same man, Jonny Coggan, wheelchair rugby player, sits in his chair beside a mangled car wreck with a black backdrop behind him.  

An athlete with a prosthetic lower leg walks on a treadmill, shaking his head and grimacing with effort.  

Now, a fast montage of athletes: a male swimmer with no hand; wheelchair racer Mickey Bushell waiting to start his race; Jon Hall,wheelchair basketball player, looking intense; and a swimmer with one arm and one leg diving off the starting block. Printed over these images are the words:‘Forget everything you thought you knew about strength.’  

As David Anthony and Aaron Phipps clash violently during a wheelchair rugby game, sprinter Kyle Powell poses in front of a concrete wall and a woman with a prosthetic lower leg jumps the long jump, another sentence reads: 'Forget everything you thought you knew about humans.'  

Children smile behind some black railings, one cyclist overtakes another, a swimmer does back stroke, a runner with two prosthetic lower legs racers a runner with one, and a blind footballer kicks the ball during the match. Up come the words: 'It's time to do battle.'  

A wheelchair basketball game in motion, a swimmer diving in, three women running a race, two swimmers congratulating each other, an Italian coach talking to his athlete, two male runners embracing after a race, an athlete speeding past on a three-wheeler.  

And white words on a black background: 'Meet the Superhumans'.  

A final, separate montage starts with wheelchair basketballplayer Peter Finbow taking a penalty shot, launching the ball over-arm straight and clean into the hoop while the other players watch from further back. Then rapid images of a swimmer viewed from under the water, runners then wheelchair racers setting off from the starting line, wheelchair basketball and rugby games in action, a line of swimmers diving in backwards at the start of a race, a cyclist’s pedals turning fast in the velodrome... then the approach to the white Olympic stadium which sits beneath a cloudy blue sky.  

Lastly, some of Great Britain's Paralympians stand or sit in their wheelchairs in a curving concrete passageway of the stadium, all wearing the GB costume.  

Claire Cashmore, Steve Brown, Jon-Allan Butterworth, Jonnie Peacock, Simon Munn, Dave Clarke, Hannah Cockroft, Jody Cundy and Ellie Simmonds.  

Beside the Channel 4 logo - a white 4 against a greybackground - the words: 'Meet the Superhumans. The Paralympic Games on 4. 29.08.2012.'  

Watch the Meet the Superhumans trail

 

2.  Samsung advertising campaign.  Sport doesn't care who you are.

 


Download Video in mp4 format HERE